The Eat Game Awards - Q&A with Adam & Tom

 
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Eve Jones poses a Q&A to our two nominated Chefs.

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Chef Adam Fanson

Why is eating game important?

It’s a healthy, wild and sustainable source of meat, who's industry helps to maintain the countryside.

Where do you source your game meat?

Partridge and pheasant obviously from Loyton, most other game I get from my butcher who sources locally over Exmoor.

Favourite game to cook with.

At the moment I’m loving serving up duck hearts as a canapé. Quickly fried so still pink inside and served with maple syrup and hazelnuts for dipping in, they make a delicious pre-dinner nibble... I could eat a whole bowl of them (sorry ducks!)

What game do you most like to eat?

The other night I cooked up grouse for guests. The crown was simply roasted and the legs were cooked in duck fat for hours, the meat rolled into balls, surrounded by potato and then deep fried- what’s not to love? If I could afford to eat it more often I would.

How do you encourage guns and guests to try more game?

I always have a few items on my dinner menu and if they don’t choose them, I’ll pop some gamey canapés on before hand to tempt them for their next visit.

What inspires your game recipes?

I follow lots of other chefs on instagram which can help inspire me but I also have a growing library of cookbooks (bigger bookcase required) which I’m always flicking through for ideas. I like to see what’s in season and what I can get my hands on, and generally keep it relatively simple and traditional and let the game shine.

Best starter game meat for beginners to eat or cook?

Don’t be scared to try cooking ANY game! If you have a meat thermometer, use it to make sure you are cooking your game to the right temperature. That way it will not dry out which often happens and puts people off eating game again. If you have an extra day to play with, try brining your game, it will come out extra juicy and be delicious with whatever you serve it with.


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Chef Tom Godber-Ford Moore

Why is eating game important?

If meat production wasn’t an integral element of the sport, then the ethical concerns raised would spell a very imminent end to the industry as a whole. This is an industry that not only benefits our countryside environmentally, but economically too - an industry upon which entire rural communities can be almost wholly dependent.

Where do you source your game meat?

Almost entirely Exmoor, apart from the odd grouse - sadly those days are over on Exmoor, more’s the pity!

Favourite game to cook with.

Despite being in constant supply, it has to be the pheasant - it ticks a lot of boxes for me. It has enough flavour to be interesting, without so much as to make one sick of it (I don’t think I could eat grouse every day). It has more texture than partridge, has glorious seams of sweet yellow fat and its versatility knows no bounds.

What game do you most like to eat?

Despite getting childishly excited about the first grouse of the season, or the occasional woodcock or snipe, I find myself returning to good old pheasant more often than not.

How do you encourage guns and guests to try more game?

By making it as approachable as possible- it’s unrealistic to expect dead game in the feather to become a popular choice for supper. I am convinced that the answer to current issues in this field lies in both adding value to the meat and making the cooking and eating of that meat as convenient as is necessary for the modern existence.

What inspires your game recipes?

When it comes to writing game recipes for others I usually think of three things - it has to be crowd pleasing, it has to be easy to cook, and it has to be different. The flavoursome nature of game meat makes this really quite simple - it will take all manner of spicing and herbing and has the guts to stand up to it.

Best starter game meat for beginners to eat or cook?

If you’ve never tried game before, you really can’t go wrong with a pheasant Goujon!